>C is for Cinephilia Studies (plus some telephilia, too)

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A veritable labour of love, today, from Film Studies For Free: a list of links to freely available online resources devoted to the study of cinephilia, telephilia and videophilia – the putatively excessive love for whatever is projected (or broadcast or played) on screens large and small. Truth be told: FSFF can’t really see what’s excessive about that… (Updated June 1, 2009)

To conclude, the normally parsimonious (Open Access championing) Film Studies For Free blog doesn’t usually plug books that you have to pay for (even though its owner both writes and, of course, reads such papercentric objects) but it absolutely must flag up the fact that it is very much looking forward to Scott Balcerzak and Jason Sperb’s forthcoming Cinephilia in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, Pleasure and Digital Culture, vol. 1, due to be published by Wallflower Press in June 2009.

This first volume in a twin-anthology project includes contributions by Robert Burgoyne, Zach Campbell, Tobey Crockett, Brian Darr, Kevin Fisher, Andy Horbal, Christian Keathley, Adrian Martin, Jenna Ng, Lisa Purse, Dan Sallitt and Girish Shambu, as well as by Sperb and Balcerzak.

As today’s links list so amply testifies, so many of these authors have already tirelessly shared their work on this topic for free online. FSFF thinks this is very much a book worth having.

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C is for Cinephilia Studies (plus some telephilia, too)


A veritable labour of love, today, from Film Studies For Free: a list of links to freely available online resources devoted to the study of cinephilia, telephilia and videophilia – the putatively excessive love for whatever is projected (or broadcast or played) on screens large and small. Truth be told: FSFF can’t really see what’s excessive about that… (Updated June 1, 2009)

To conclude, the normally parsimonious (Open Access championing) Film Studies For Free blog doesn’t usually plug books that you have to pay for (even though its owner both writes and, of course, reads such papercentric objects) but it absolutely must flag up the fact that it is very much looking forward to Scott Balcerzak and Jason Sperb’s forthcoming Cinephilia in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, Pleasure and Digital Culture, vol. 1, due to be published by Wallflower Press in June 2009.

This first volume in a twin-anthology project includes contributions by Robert Burgoyne, Zach Campbell, Tobey Crockett, Brian Darr, Kevin Fisher, Andy Horbal, Christian Keathley, Adrian Martin, Jenna Ng, Lisa Purse, Dan Sallitt and Girish Shambu, as well as by Sperb and Balcerzak.

As today’s links list so amply testifies, so many of these authors have already tirelessly shared their work on this topic for free online. FSFF thinks this is very much a book worth having.

>’Final Girl’ Studies

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Film Studies For Free loves plucky female film protagonists (and false protagonists, for that matter) still fighting on in there at “The End”.

It also loves Carol J. Clover’s 1987 essay ‘Her Body, Himself: Gender in the Slasher Film,’ (Representations [Number 20: Fall 1987, pp. 187-228] – later included by Clover in her hugely influential book Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film [Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press,1992]), which was the first work to coin the resonant phrase ‘Final Girl‘ to name climactic female survivors of slasher/horror/fantasy-sci-fi-horror films.

Clover’s essay asked the following, rather fascinating, question: why, in these films which are supposedly principally aimed at male spectators, are the surviving heroes so often women characters?

It’s a question that has been frequently addressed, since, in film, television, and now videogame studies, many of them freely available online. So here’s Film Studies For Free’s not-so-weak-and-feeble list of terribly-brave-and-resilient links to open-access “Final Girl” Studies, beginning with Clover’s key essay, and then proceeding in an orderly alphabetical direction, by author surname:

FSFF also highly recommends that you visit Slayage: International Journal of Buffy Studies for lots of other relevant studies.

‘Final Girl’ Studies

Film Studies For Free loves plucky female film protagonists (and false protagonists, for that matter) still fighting on in there at “The End”.

It also loves Carol J. Clover’s 1987 essay ‘Her Body, Himself: Gender in the Slasher Film,’ (Representations [Number 20: Fall 1987, pp. 187-228] – later included by Clover in her hugely influential book Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film [Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press,1992]), which was the first work to coin the resonant phrase ‘Final Girl‘ to name climactic female survivors of slasher/horror/fantasy-sci-fi-horror films.

Clover’s essay asked the following, rather fascinating, question: why, in these films which are supposedly principally aimed at male spectators, are the surviving heroes so often women characters?

It’s a question that has been frequently addressed, since, in film, television, and now videogame studies, many of them freely available online. So here’s Film Studies For Free’s not-so-weak-and-feeble list of terribly-brave-and-resilient links to open-access “Final Girl” Studies, beginning with Clover’s key essay, and then proceeding in an orderly alphabetical direction, by author surname:

FSFF also highly recommends that you visit Slayage: International Journal of Buffy Studies for lots of other relevant studies.

>Classic Latin American film studies in memory of Mario Benedetti

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Sequence from El lado oscuro del corazón (The Dark Side of the Heart, Argentina, 1992, directed by Eliseo Subiela) featuring Mario Benedetti’s poem ‘No te salves/’Don’t Save Yourself’ (recited by Oliverio/Dario Grandinetti to Ana/ Sandra Ballesteros) and starring Benedetti himself as ‘El poeta alemán’/’the German Poet’ reading his poem ‘Corazón coraza’

Film Studies For Free was just going to post today on three classic Latin American film studies texts that are now fabulously available as free e-books from the wonderful people at University of Pittsburgh Press Digital Editions:

But then FSFF‘s author heard of the sad death at 88 of the great Uruguayan writer Mario Benedetti, who devoted his life to demonstrating, so beautifully, that ‘the South also exists’, in literature, politics, and the cinema.

As the BBC website reports: ‘Born to Italian immigrants, Benedetti wrote more than 80 novels, poems, short stories and essays during a career spanning six decades. His 1960 novel [La tregua] The Truce was translated into 19 languages and made into a film’, La tregua directed by Sergio Renán based on a script by Benedetti and Aída Bortnik (the film was also remade in 2003) .

While Renán‘s La tregua was probably the most important film based on Benedetti’s writing (at least in terms of its political impact), he was, in FSFF‘s opinion, the most cinematic of South American poets, with over eighteen screenplays to his name. He had a particular association with the highly lyrical film work of Argentine writer-director Eliseo Subiela (an auteur on whose work FSFF‘s author has published), especially the films El lado oscuro del corazón (1992, sequence embedded above; also see here) and Despabílate amor (aka Wake Up Love, 1996).

Below, as is FSFF‘s wont, are links to some online and freely accessible studies of the ‘Benedettian’ films of Subiela, as well as of Uruguayan and Southern Cone cinema more generally.

Nunca te salvaste, Mario… Gracias.

Classic Latin American film studies in memory of Mario Benedetti


Sequence from El lado oscuro del corazón (The Dark Side of the Heart, Argentina, 1992, directed by Eliseo Subiela) featuring Mario Benedetti’s poem ‘No te salves/’Don’t Save Yourself’ (recited by Oliverio/Dario Grandinetti to Ana/ Sandra Ballesteros) and starring Benedetti himself as ‘El poeta alemán’/’the German Poet’ reading his poem ‘Corazón coraza’

Film Studies For Free was just going to post today on three classic Latin American film studies texts that are now fabulously available as free e-books from the wonderful people at University of Pittsburgh Press Digital Editions:

But then FSFF‘s author heard of the sad death at 88 of the great Uruguayan writer Mario Benedetti, who devoted his life to demonstrating, so beautifully, that ‘the South also exists’, in literature, politics, and the cinema.

As the BBC website reports: ‘Born to Italian immigrants, Benedetti wrote more than 80 novels, poems, short stories and essays during a career spanning six decades. His 1960 novel [La tregua] The Truce was translated into 19 languages and made into a film’, La tregua directed by Sergio Renán based on a script by Benedetti and Aída Bortnik (the film was also remade in 2003) .

While Renán‘s La tregua was probably the most important film based on Benedetti’s writing (at least in terms of its political impact), he was, in FSFF‘s opinion, the most cinematic of South American poets, with over eighteen screenplays to his name. He had a particular association with the highly lyrical film work of Argentine writer-director Eliseo Subiela (an auteur on whose work FSFF‘s author has published), especially the films El lado oscuro del corazón (1992, sequence embedded above; also see here) and Despabílate amor (aka Wake Up Love, 1996).

Below, as is FSFF‘s wont, are links to some online and freely accessible studies of the ‘Benedettian’ films of Subiela, as well as of Uruguayan and Southern Cone cinema more generally.

Nunca te salvaste, Mario… Gracias.

>A Heart of Gold: Pakeezah and the Hindi Courtesan Film

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Click on the image of Meena Kumari, above, to link to the ‘Chalte Chalte‘ sequence in Pakeezah (music by by Ghulam Mohammed, lyrics by Majrooh Sultanpuri, Kaifi Azmi, Kamal Amrohi, Kaif Bhopali, sung by Lata Mangeshkar).

One of the favourite films of Film Studies For Free‘s author is Kamal Amrohi‘s Pakeezah/Pure Heart (1971), a magnificent Hindi melodrama and one of the most accomplished and beautiful films in the transnational ‘courtesan with a heart of gold‘ film genre.

As one of FSFF‘s favourite scholarly film weblogs is Michael J. Anderson‘s Tativille, you can possibly imagine how delighted it was to find that the centrepiece feature of Indian Auteur‘s third issue is Anderson‘s remarkable essay on Pakeezah. (IndianAuteur is an excellent online journal edited by Nitesh Rohit, Supriya Suri and others).

What better way to celebrate the felicitous conjunction of all of these elements, then, or to encourage FSFF readers to explore them all, than a little list of Friday links to online and freely accessible studies touching on Pakeezah, Kamal Amrohi, Meena Kumari (pictured above) and the Hindi Courtesan Film.

A Heart of Gold: Pakeezah and the Hindi Courtesan Film


Click on the image of Meena Kumari, above, to link to the ‘Chalte Chalte‘ sequence in Pakeezah (music by by Ghulam Mohammed, lyrics by Majrooh Sultanpuri, Kaifi Azmi, Kamal Amrohi, Kaif Bhopali, sung by Lata Mangeshkar).

One of the favourite films of Film Studies For Free‘s author is Kamal Amrohi‘s Pakeezah/Pure Heart (1971), a magnificent Hindi melodrama and one of the most accomplished and beautiful films in the transnational ‘courtesan with a heart of gold‘ film genre.

As one of FSFF‘s favourite scholarly film weblogs is Michael J. Anderson‘s Tativille, you can possibly imagine how delighted it was to find that the centrepiece feature of Indian Auteur‘s third issue is Anderson‘s remarkable essay on Pakeezah. (IndianAuteur is an excellent online journal edited by Nitesh Rohit, Supriya Suri and others).

What better way to celebrate the felicitous conjunction of all of these elements, then, or to encourage FSFF readers to explore them all, than a little list of Friday links to online and freely accessible studies touching on Pakeezah, Kamal Amrohi, Meena Kumari (pictured above) and the Hindi Courtesan Film.

>More on the video essay: Jim Emerson’s Close Up: the movie/essay/dream

>

Lots of correspondence after yesterday’s post on the video essays of Matt Zoller Seitz and Kevin B Lee has prompted Film Studies For Free to research the online work of a number of other film artists/academics. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts about this shortly.

FSFF would also love to hear from any of its readers who can point in the direction of further examples of good-quality, freely-accessible, scholarly online video essays to check out.

But, in the meantime, here are some great links to the online video essay work of a highly notable film critic who has very successfully experimented with this form: Jim Emerson, film critic and creator of Scanners (a movie blog and home of the Opening Shots Project) and founding editor of/contributor to RogerEbert.com, Roger Ebert`s web site.

See more of Emerson’s movie clips HERE.

More on the video essay: Jim Emerson’s Close Up: the movie/essay/dream

Lots of correspondence after yesterday’s post on the video essays of Matt Zoller Seitz and Kevin B Lee has prompted Film Studies For Free to research the online work of a number of other film artists/academics. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts about this shortly.

FSFF would also love to hear from any of its readers who can point in the direction of further examples of good-quality, freely-accessible, scholarly online video essays to check out.

But, in the meantime, here are some great links to the online video essay work of a highly notable film critic who has very successfully experimented with this form: Jim Emerson, film critic and creator of Scanners (a movie blog and home of the Opening Shots Project) and founding editor of/contributor to RogerEbert.com, Roger Ebert`s web site.

See more of Emerson’s movie clips HERE.