Ten Favourite Full-Length Films Online For Free


Image from À Propos de Nice (Jean Vigo, 1930)

Film Studies For Free is about to depart on its holidays (sun, sea, sand, and definitely no cyberspace), but — philanthropic to the last — it wanted to leave its readers with some cultural and educational sustenance during what will inevitably be its much lamented absence.

So, here, folks, are some (emboldened) links to a few of FSFF‘s favourite free full-length films currently online, including mini-Luis Buñuel, Alfred Hitchcock and Jean Vigo fests:

See you all again in early-ish August with mammoth links-posts, more video essays, and some ‘think-pieces’ about Film Studies online, too…

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Ten Favourite Full-Length Films Online For Free


Image from À Propos de Nice (Jean Vigo, 1930)

Film Studies For Free is about to depart on its holidays (sun, sea, sand, and definitely no cyberspace), but — philanthropic to the last — it wanted to leave its readers with some cultural and educational sustenance during what will inevitably be its much lamented absence.

So, here, folks, are some (emboldened) links to a few of FSFF‘s favourite free full-length films currently online, including mini-Luis Buñuel, Alfred Hitchcock and Jean Vigo fests:

See you all again in early-ish August with mammoth links-posts, more video essays, and some ‘think-pieces’ about Film Studies online, too…

>More V.F. Perkins Online

>


Image from You Only Live Once (Fritz Lang, 1937)

Film Studies For Free is extremely fond of the work of V. F. Perkins, world-renowned author of Film as Film (London: Penguin Books, 1972 – see an recent interesting review HERE).

FSFF has previously drawn attention to two pieces of Perkins’ hugely influential work which are freely available online:

  • ‘Same Tune Again! Repetition and Framing in Letter from an Unknown Woman’ (originally published in CineAction! no. 52) republished online by Danish film studies journal 16:9 (September 2003) and accessible HERE.
  • ‘Moments of Choice’ [on film directing] (originally published in The Movie, ch. 58, reprinted in Ann Lloyd (ed.), Movie Book of the Fifties, Orbis, 1982) republished online by the Australian journal Rouge (issue 9, 2006) and accessible HERE.

Today, it is delighted to bring to its readers’ attention a further Open Access essay by Perkins which is currently stored at WRAP: the Warwick Research Archive Project.

The piece is an as yet undated and otherwise unpublished article entitled ‘You Only Live Once‘ that brilliantly treats this magisterial 1937 film directed by Fritz Lang.

Here’s an excerpt from the essay with relevant hyperlinks added by FSFF:

Anyone who wants to write usefully about You Only Live Once has to build on the work of George M Wilson. A chapter in [Narration in Light: Studies in Cinematic Point of View (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986)] makes a systematic presentation of the movie’s narrative strategies, and a detailed reading of key images. Wilson shows how Lang’s picture is designed to educate its viewers in the manipulability of the image, and to demonstrate the power of the film sequence to deceive us by obscuring key points in its story and by soliciting preferred readings that the content of the images may not in fact guarantee. The achievement that Wilson uncovers is the more remarkable in that it occurs not in an illustrated lecture but in a fiction movie, one that works to powerful effect within its genre of social protest melodrama.

Wilson’s essay opened my eyes to You Only Live Once, a movie that I had previously found opaque because, apart from its evident social project, I had not seen a purpose in its meticulous design beyond that of giving power and plausibility to a noticeably contrived tale. In what follows I take for granted the main lines of Wilson’s argument in order to develop some remarks on Lang’s mise-en-scène in two representative sequences.

More V.F. Perkins Online


Image from You Only Live Once (Fritz Lang, 1937)

Film Studies For Free is extremely fond of the work of V. F. Perkins, world-renowned author of Film as Film (London: Penguin Books, 1972 – see an recent interesting review HERE).

FSFF has previously drawn attention to two pieces of Perkins’ hugely influential work which are freely available online:

  • ‘Same Tune Again! Repetition and Framing in Letter from an Unknown Woman’ (originally published in CineAction! no. 52) republished online by Danish film studies journal 16:9 (September 2003) and accessible HERE.
  • ‘Moments of Choice’ [on film directing] (originally published in The Movie, ch. 58, reprinted in Ann Lloyd (ed.), Movie Book of the Fifties, Orbis, 1982) republished online by the Australian journal Rouge (issue 9, 2006) and accessible HERE.

Today, it is delighted to bring to its readers’ attention a further Open Access essay by Perkins which is currently stored at WRAP: the Warwick Research Archive Project.

The piece is an as yet undated and otherwise unpublished article entitled ‘You Only Live Once‘ that brilliantly treats this magisterial 1937 film directed by Fritz Lang.

Here’s an excerpt from the essay with relevant hyperlinks added by FSFF:

Anyone who wants to write usefully about You Only Live Once has to build on the work of George M Wilson. A chapter in [Narration in Light: Studies in Cinematic Point of View (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986)] makes a systematic presentation of the movie’s narrative strategies, and a detailed reading of key images. Wilson shows how Lang’s picture is designed to educate its viewers in the manipulability of the image, and to demonstrate the power of the film sequence to deceive us by obscuring key points in its story and by soliciting preferred readings that the content of the images may not in fact guarantee. The achievement that Wilson uncovers is the more remarkable in that it occurs not in an illustrated lecture but in a fiction movie, one that works to powerful effect within its genre of social protest melodrama.

Wilson’s essay opened my eyes to You Only Live Once, a movie that I had previously found opaque because, apart from its evident social project, I had not seen a purpose in its meticulous design beyond that of giving power and plausibility to a noticeably contrived tale. In what follows I take for granted the main lines of Wilson’s argument in order to develop some remarks on Lang’s mise-en-scène in two representative sequences.

>Vampires, Vamps, and Va Va Voom: Recordings and Abstracts

>

The ever-wonderful Adrian Martin made it all too easy for Film Studies For Free today and very helpfully pointed it in the direction of a wonderful online Film Studies resource: recordings and abstracts of the papers for Vampires Vamps and Va Va Voom: A Critical Engagement with Paranormal Romance, a Two-Day Symposium, organised by the Sìdhe Literary Collective, Monash University, 19 & 20 September 2008. Below are the all important links:

FSFF says Fangs Adrian!

Vampires, Vamps, and Va Va Voom: Recordings and Abstracts

The ever-wonderful Adrian Martin made it all too easy for Film Studies For Free today and very helpfully pointed it in the direction of a wonderful online Film Studies resource: recordings and abstracts of the papers for Vampires Vamps and Va Va Voom: A Critical Engagement with Paranormal Romance, a Two-Day Symposium, organised by the Sìdhe Literary Collective, Monash University, 19 & 20 September 2008. Below are the all important links:

FSFF says Fangs Adrian!

>Are you now or have you ever been a non-anglophone film blogger?

>


HarryTuttle — he of one of Film Studies For Free‘s favourite film blogs Screenville, based in Paris (France!) — is seeking greater contact with non-English language speaking (or not only English-language speaking) film bloggers – in the first instance with ones from ‘Iran, China/Hong Kong, […] Africa, Taiwan, South Korea, The Philippines, Thailand, Argentina, Japan, Mexico, Turkey, India, Russia’.

Tuttle’s aim is both simple and highly laudable: the greater internationalization of critical film discourse by expanding the voices contributing to it, as well as by connecting those voices up much more effectively.

I dream of a blogosphere we could navigate to meet film lovers from any […] country, and be able to read their thoughts on cinema, in their own language, or translated (one way or the other). I talked about this project for a long time now (here for example), without being able to discover new blogs out there on my own, so I hope to find some help in a collective effort for everyone interested in this endeavour. All help is welcome if you share this concern to meet foreign film bloggers.

The project is connected (as per the link in the quote) to some comments made by Adrian Martin in a FilmKrant article last November:

Almost every film magazine on the Net sticks to an old, pre-WWW format: reviews of current film releases, the latest Film Festivals and events and books, some general reflections on cinema and its cultural context. But the idea of the ‘local’ reigns supreme: when a new film reaches your city, that’s when you devote serious attention to it – for the sake of your local audience. But why should it matter, any longer, whether You, the Living premieres in Cannes in 2007 or Melbourne in 2008 or Iceland in 2010? Cyber-magazines still refuse to face the implications of their global address; they are afraid to throw open their topics and co-ordinates.

[…]

[T]he film magazine of the future will be both a generator and an organiser of those critiques.

[Also see the related blog post Nomad Cinephilia (Adrian Martin)]

Great stuff! For its part, to begin with, Film Studies For Free has contributed what it hopes will be a useful link for Screenville‘s project: one to the website Global Voices Online which has a film feed HERE.

But, if you can help or simply want to find out more about this project, please visit Harry at Screenville tout de suite!

Are you now or have you ever been a non-anglophone film blogger?


HarryTuttle — he of one of Film Studies For Free‘s favourite film blogs Screenville, based in Paris (France!) — is seeking greater contact with non-English language speaking (or not only English-language speaking) film bloggers – in the first instance with ones from ‘Iran, China/Hong Kong, […] Africa, Taiwan, South Korea, The Philippines, Thailand, Argentina, Japan, Mexico, Turkey, India, Russia’.

Tuttle’s aim is both simple and highly laudable: the greater internationalization of critical film discourse by expanding the voices contributing to it, as well as by connecting those voices up much more effectively.

I dream of a blogosphere we could navigate to meet film lovers from any […] country, and be able to read their thoughts on cinema, in their own language, or translated (one way or the other). I talked about this project for a long time now (here for example), without being able to discover new blogs out there on my own, so I hope to find some help in a collective effort for everyone interested in this endeavour. All help is welcome if you share this concern to meet foreign film bloggers.

The project is connected (as per the link in the quote) to some comments made by Adrian Martin in a FilmKrant article last November:

Almost every film magazine on the Net sticks to an old, pre-WWW format: reviews of current film releases, the latest Film Festivals and events and books, some general reflections on cinema and its cultural context. But the idea of the ‘local’ reigns supreme: when a new film reaches your city, that’s when you devote serious attention to it – for the sake of your local audience. But why should it matter, any longer, whether You, the Living premieres in Cannes in 2007 or Melbourne in 2008 or Iceland in 2010? Cyber-magazines still refuse to face the implications of their global address; they are afraid to throw open their topics and co-ordinates.

[…]

[T]he film magazine of the future will be both a generator and an organiser of those critiques.

[Also see the related blog post Nomad Cinephilia (Adrian Martin)]

Great stuff! For its part, to begin with, Film Studies For Free has contributed what it hopes will be a useful link for Screenville‘s project: one to the website Global Voices Online which has a film feed HERE.

But, if you can help or simply want to find out more about this project, please visit Harry at Screenville tout de suite!

The Art of the Title Sequence – Website

Thanks to the ever-trusty Guardian Guide Internet Review this weekend, Film Studies For Free found out more about a great website devoted to explorations of the beginnings of films: The Art of the Title Sequence. It’s a beautifully illustrated site, discussing and streaming an abundance of examples of this Art, from the famously daring-but-coy ‘zero gravity’ credits from Barbarella through to the brilliant opening to Nina Paley‘s remarkable animated film Sita Sings the Blues (2008 – see the entire film from Paley’s website, or the Internet Archive, for free; a video interview with Paley is HERE).

The Art of the Title Sequence is highly recommended. Below are some links to highlights from the website.

Feature articles:

Interviews:

The Art of the Title Sequence – Website

Thanks to the ever-trusty Guardian Guide Internet Review this weekend, Film Studies For Free found out more about a great website devoted to explorations of the beginnings of films: The Art of the Title Sequence. It’s a beautifully illustrated site, discussing and streaming an abundance of examples of this Art, from the famously daring-but-coy ‘zero gravity’ credits from Barbarella through to the brilliant opening to Nina Paley‘s remarkable animated film Sita Sings the Blues (2008 – see the entire film from Paley’s website, or the Internet Archive, for free; a video interview with Paley is HERE).

The Art of the Title Sequence is highly recommended. Below are some links to highlights from the website.

Feature articles:

Interviews: