Expanded Cinema and Video Art: Tate Video and Essays from REWIND (Cubitt, Atherton, Hatfield)

Expanded Cinema: Activating the Space of Reception. A Tate Video – Works identified as Expanded Cinema often open up questions surrounding the spectator’s construction of time/space relations, activating the spaces of cinema and narrative as well as other contexts of media reception. In doing so it offers an alternative and challenging perspective on filmmaking, visual arts practices and the narratives of social space, everyday life and cultural communication.

Today, Film Studies For Free brings you more choice links to valuable resources on the topics of ‘expanded cinema‘ and video art. Not only the wonderful Tate Video embedded above but also, courtesy of a great scholarly website — REWIND – Artists’ Film & Video in the 70s and 80s — the following essays:

  • ‘Greyscale Video and the Shift to Colour’ by Prof. Sean Cubitt, University of Melbourne, Australia. View a pdf of the Essay in ‘Art Journal’, Fall 2006 edition here. A video essay version of the paper is viewable here.

  • ‘Projection: Vanishing and Becoming’ by Prof. Sean Cubitt, University of Melbourne, Australia. In Grau, Oliver, Eds. MediaArtHistories, pages pp. 407-422. MIT Press. View a pdf of the Essay here.

  • ‘The Trouble with Video Art‘ by Kevin Atherton, Head of Media, National College of Art & Design, Dublin. View a pdf of the Essay here.

  • ‘Expanded Cinema – And the “Cinema of Attractions”‘ by Dr. Jackie Hatfield. (Published in Filmwaves, Issue 27/1/2005). View a pdf of the Essay here.

  • ‘The Subject in Expanded Cinema’ by Dr. Jackie Hatfield. (Published in Filmwaves, Issue 24/2/2004). View a pdf of the Essay here.

An addendum: if you live in London, or care about cinema in that city, Film Studies For Free urges you, please, to visit the website of the Picture Palace Campaign for the regeneration of the former art deco cinema, now bingo hall, soon to be (possibly) evangelical church, at 25 Church Road, SE19 (Crystal Palace). It was originally built in 1928 as a cinema and the beautiful interior was designed by the renowned cinema architect George Coles (see also here).

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