>On "England" and "Englishness" in British Cinema and Television

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Updated July 27, 2010
Image from Went the Day Well? (Alberto Cavalcanti, 1942)

Film Studies For Free was recently very inspired by Nick James’s wonderful overview of the career of Brazilian Alberto Cavalcanti for next month’s Sight and Sound magazine. As a huge fan of Cavalcanti’s work, and in particular of his (and Ealing‘s) Went the Day Well? (indeed, FSFF‘s author lives in a English village uncannily like that portrayed in this film), it immediately set about researching a list of links to online scholarly works on the Brazilian filmmaker, only to discover very few openly accessible ones in English (do check out, though, Kristin Thompson and David Cairn‘s essays on Went the Day Well?, and the latter’s other postings on Cavalcanti here, here, here, here, and here).

FSFF‘s author’s rage at this overall lack of anglophone material (see the photographic evidence above) was eventually sublimated in a different curatorial project, one still connected to themes at the heart of Cavalcanti’s work, and also to some related topics explored in further August 2010 Sight and Sound articles (ones sadly not [yet] online: William Fowler’s ‘Absent authors: Folk in artist film’, and Rob Young’s ‘The pattern under the plough’).

Anyhow, below you will find the fruit of this inspiration and frustration: a list of links to thoughtful and thought-provoking international scholarship on expressions of “England” and (multifarious) “Englishness” in (mostly) British cinema and television.

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      6 thoughts on “>On "England" and "Englishness" in British Cinema and Television

      1. >David, thanks a lot for those additional, very welcome Cavalcanti entries: I've added clickable links above. And Nick, many thanks for the Calvo Pascual suggestion – also added in full above; a perfect addition to the list.

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