The Cine-Files on the French New Wave

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Memory Screens: New Issue of IMAGE AND NARRATIVE

Frame grab from 1975 (Shaun Wilson, version 1 (2005), DV as single channel DVD, colour, sound, 5mins). Visit Shaun Wilson‘s website here and read his article about ‘home movies’ here

The concept of memory screens is an overarching term exploring the relationship between forms of media, viewers, practitioners and memory. The notion of memory screens alludes to the ways in which memories become remembered, layered, forgotten and transformed. The range of articles in this volume reflects the relationship between memory and history, both public and personal. [‘Thematic Cluster: Introduction’ by Teresa Forde]

Film Studies For Free continues to be impressed by the excellence of the online journal Image and Narrative which has recently published a special issue entitled Memory Screens.

FSFF particularly appreciated film and video artist Shaun Wilson’s essay on the art of vintage home movies, Jenny Chamarette’s study of the dynamics of the ‘spectre’ or ‘spectral body’ of the auteurist figure of Agnès Varda, Peter Kravanja’s exploration of narrative contingencies in Rohmer and Akerman and Teresa Forde and Erin Bell‘s discussions of memory and British television. But this is a very high quality issue throughout and, as always at I and N, particularly characterised by the thoughtful integration of close analysis and film and moving image theory.

Image and Narrative, Vol 12, No 2 (2011): Memory Screens

Table of Contents

  • ‘Thematic Cluster: Introduction’ by Teresa Forde ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘Remixing Memory through Home Movies’ by Shaun Wilson ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘Video Installation, Memory and Storytelling: the viewer as narrator’ by Diane Charleson ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘Spectral bodies, temporalised spaces: Agnès Varda’s motile gestures of mourning and memorial’ by Jenny Chamarette ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘Television and memory: history programming and contemporary identities’ by Erin Bell ABSTRACTPDF
  • ‘Television Dramas as Memory Screens’ by Teresa Forde ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘The Lives of Others: re-remembering the German Democratic Republic’  by Margaret Montgomerie and Anne- Kathrin Reck ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘Nostalgic [re]remembering: film fan cultures and the affective reiteration of popular film histories’ by Nathan Hunt ABSTRACT PDF

Various Articles

  • ‘Cinema, Contingencies, Metaphysics’ by Peter Kravanja ABSTRACT PDF

Review Articles

  • Hillary Chute’s Ambivalent Idiom of Witness’ by Charlotte Pylyser  ABSTRACT PDF
  • ‘Naissances de la bande dessinée de William Hogarth à Winsor McCay’ by Pascal Lefèvre ABSTRACT PDF

>New World Picture 5: Varda, Solomon, Citron, Jacobs, Schneeman, Wisconsin Death Trip,

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Image from Innocence and Despair (Phil Solomon, 2001). Experience Solomon’s video at World Picture Journal 5: Sustainability

Film Studies For Free is a longstanding and ardent supporter of the online journal World Picture. Today, FSFF is thrilled to bring you news of the latest issue (no. 5) on Sustainability which has just gone online. There are plenty of wonderful film-related items, as usual, as well as some timely and important essays and interviews on sustainability from a number of other key perspectives for the Arts and Humanities.

Great work, WP!

Below, you can find the issue’s  table of contents, and below that you can find the call for papers for the next World Picture conference, this time in Toronto, so do please scroll down for those.


  • Ian MacKaye in conversation with Brian Price Records

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2011 World Picture Conference 
October 21-22 University of Toronto 
Lorenz Engell, Bauhaus University, Weimar Elizabeth Povinelli, Columbia University

The annual World Picture Conference gathers scholars from a range of different disciplines to address the relation between critical theory, philosophy, and aesthetics. For this year’s meeting we welcome papers on questions of distance. Such considerations might include (but are in no sense limited to):  
  • Distance and mediation (technological and otherwise) 
  • Distance as abstraction (or alienation, estrangement) 
  • Travel Simultaneity
  • Spatial allegories of distance
  • Vision (as the prime sense organ of distance)
  • Modes of translation
  • Geopolitics (of distance)
  • Distance and/as interval (distance as time, not just space) 
  • Distance and unknowing/ignorance 
  • Critique of proximity/propinquity 
  • Ecology and distance (global footprints, carbon calculations, etc.) 
  • Scale Emotion Critical distance/objectivity

Please submit proposals (250 words, plus brief bio) by June 17 to: brian.price@utoronto.ca

>Agnès Varda Podcast and Links

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Film Studies For Free is working on a longer post on video essays, but it had to rush to its readers, in the meantime, with the hot news of a great podcast interview with French director and film essayist Agnès Varda by a longstanding admirer and acquaintance of hers, radio journalist Ruth Seymour for the Politics of Culture slot at KCRW. Their principal topic of conversation was Varda’s latest documentary Les Plages d’Agnès/ The Beaches of Agnès (France, 2009). The interview has been online since yesterday and FSFF sends its thanks for the rapid tip-off to Sasha Berman.

The podcast can be accessed at the KCRW website by clicking HERE. For those interested the English-language press kit (pdf) for The Beaches of Agnès can be accessed HERE. See also Nick Dawson’s great recent interview with Varda for Filmmaker Magazine HERE.

Below is an FSFF selection of links to highly worthwhile and freely-accessible online material pertaining to this great filmmaker.

Video essay by Varda (in French):

Réponse de femmes, Notre corps, notre sexe – un documentaire d’Agnès Varda (1977) 7 mins 48 secs

‘In 1975, it was the Year of the Woman. [French TV channel] Antenne 2 asked seven female filmmakers the question : “How does it feel to be a woman?”. They had to answer with a seven-minute movie. Agnès Varda chose to answer with the cine-leaflet “Réponses de femmes”. It is a possible answer concerning women’s bodies and the feminine condition. In this short movie, women, from female children to old women, chat about sex, desire, advertising and children (to have some or not) : “our object-body, our taboo-body, our body with or without children, our sex, etc…”. How can we experience our body? How can we experience our sex? On a white set, women, dressed or naked, try to answer the question “What is a woman?”. One answers: “To be a woman is to be born in a female body”. Nothing more, no idea of feminine essence, or predisposition to motherhood, ideas against which the feminist movement was struggling. A pregnant and naked woman, dancing and laughing loud, made a lot of viewers react : Antenne 2 got a lot of written reproaches. This cine-leaflet was aired on Antenne 2 the 23rd of June 1975. It was also nominated to Cesars 76, category documentary short-movie.’ By Feminism in Cinema weblog.

See IMDB entry on this film HERE.

Video interviews and talks:

Scholarly articles in English:

Scholarly article in French:

Scholarly article in Spanish:

Agnès Varda Podcast and Links

Film Studies For Free is working on a longer post on video essays, but it had to rush to its readers, in the meantime, with the hot news of a great podcast interview with French director and film essayist Agnès Varda by a longstanding admirer and acquaintance of hers, radio journalist Ruth Seymour for the Politics of Culture slot at KCRW. Their principal topic of conversation was Varda’s latest documentary Les Plages d’Agnès/ The Beaches of Agnès (France, 2009). The interview has been online since yesterday and FSFF sends its thanks for the rapid tip-off to Sasha Berman.

The podcast can be accessed at the KCRW website by clicking HERE. For those interested the English-language press kit (pdf) for The Beaches of Agnès can be accessed HERE. See also Nick Dawson’s great recent interview with Varda for Filmmaker Magazine HERE.

Below is an FSFF selection of links to highly worthwhile and freely-accessible online material pertaining to this great filmmaker.

Video essay by Varda (in French):

Réponse de femmes, Notre corps, notre sexe – un documentaire d’Agnès Varda (1977) 7 mins 48 secs

‘In 1975, it was the Year of the Woman. [French TV channel] Antenne 2 asked seven female filmmakers the question : “How does it feel to be a woman?”. They had to answer with a seven-minute movie. Agnès Varda chose to answer with the cine-leaflet “Réponses de femmes”. It is a possible answer concerning women’s bodies and the feminine condition. In this short movie, women, from female children to old women, chat about sex, desire, advertising and children (to have some or not) : “our object-body, our taboo-body, our body with or without children, our sex, etc…”. How can we experience our body? How can we experience our sex? On a white set, women, dressed or naked, try to answer the question “What is a woman?”. One answers: “To be a woman is to be born in a female body”. Nothing more, no idea of feminine essence, or predisposition to motherhood, ideas against which the feminist movement was struggling. A pregnant and naked woman, dancing and laughing loud, made a lot of viewers react : Antenne 2 got a lot of written reproaches. This cine-leaflet was aired on Antenne 2 the 23rd of June 1975. It was also nominated to Cesars 76, category documentary short-movie.’ By Feminism in Cinema weblog.

See IMDB entry on this film HERE.

Video interviews and talks:

Scholarly articles in English:

Scholarly article in French:

Scholarly article in Spanish:

>Agnès Varda on gleaning, plus other free public open video lectures from the European Graduate School

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Agnès Varda, French director, photographer and filmmaker discussing filmmaking and her film Les Glaneurs et la glaneuse/The Gleaners and I, 2000, at the European Graduate School, in 2004 (video 1 of 6). See also ‘Beautiful Trash: Agnès Varda’s Les Glaneurs et la glaneuse‘ by Virginia Bonner at Senses of Cinema

As ‘gleaning‘ is this blog‘s favourite activity, Film Studies For Free was happy to explore the European Graduate School (EGS) video channel at YouTube. The channel offers access to videos and video clips of great lectures, sessions, and interviews with well-known guest professors, including many filmmakers and film/media academics at the EGS Media and Communication Studies Department, Saas-Fee in Switzerland. You can access another list of older, shorter guest-lecturer, videos/clips (streamed using RealPlayer) at the EGS website, too. See below for the film and media studies highlights (in FSFF‘s opinion) of both EGS video-lists:

See also the following, shorter, film/media studies-related videos from 1999-2001, archived at the European Graduate School website . Just click on the lecture titles to open RealPlayer files:

Agnès Varda on gleaning, plus other free public open video lectures from the European Graduate School

Agnès Varda, French director, photographer and filmmaker discussing filmmaking and her film Les Glaneurs et la glaneuse/The Gleaners and I, 2000, at the European Graduate School, in 2004 (video 1 of 6). See also ‘Beautiful Trash: Agnès Varda’s Les Glaneurs et la glaneuse‘ by Virginia Bonner at Senses of Cinema

As ‘gleaning‘ is this blog‘s favourite activity, Film Studies For Free was happy to explore the European Graduate School (EGS) video channel at YouTube. The channel offers access to videos and video clips of great lectures, sessions, and interviews with well-known guest professors, including many filmmakers and film/media academics at the EGS Media and Communication Studies Department, Saas-Fee in Switzerland. You can access another list of older, shorter guest-lecturer, videos/clips (streamed using RealPlayer) at the EGS website, too. See below for the film and media studies highlights (in FSFF‘s opinion) of both EGS video-lists:

See also the following, shorter, film/media studies-related videos from 1999-2001, archived at the European Graduate School website . Just click on the lecture titles to open RealPlayer files:

More Film Studies videos online: Haynes, Minghella, Ahtila, Varda, and Mulvey

Eija-Liisa Ahtila, from ‘The House’ (2002)

Here below are some more links to great online webcasts of very worthwhile, film and film-studies events, as stored in the Tate Galleries online archive (see previous posts on this topic HERE, HERE, and HERE):

There is also a webcast of an interview, in the ‘Moving Images’ series, with Laura Mulvey (7 March 2002) at the Tate Modern, but the link is reported as faulty by the Tate website at present. They say they will fix it, so wait a while, and then try HERE. While on the subject of Mulvey, HERE‘s a link to an online version of her classic essay, ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’.

And, to conclude, HERE‘s a link to an already pretty widely-known, online ‘access point’ for Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (Todd Haynes, 1987 – also added to Film Studies For Free’s regular listing of ‘Film Practice As Research Links’).

>More Film Studies videos online: Haynes, Minghella, Ahtila, Varda, and Mulvey

>

Eija-Liisa Ahtila, from ‘The House’ (2002)

Here below are some more links to great online webcasts of very worthwhile, film and film-studies events, as stored in the Tate Galleries online archive (see previous posts on this topic HERE, HERE, and HERE):

There is also a webcast of an interview, in the ‘Moving Images’ series, with Laura Mulvey (7 March 2002) at the Tate Modern, but the link is reported as faulty by the Tate website at present. They say they will fix it, so wait a while, and then try HERE. While on the subject of Mulvey, HERE‘s a link to an online version of her classic essay, ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’.

And, to conclude, HERE‘s a link to an already pretty widely-known, online ‘access point’ for Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (Todd Haynes, 1987 – also added to Film Studies For Free’s regular listing of ‘Film Practice As Research Links’).