>In-Sight from Excursions: action movies, neuroscience, dreamscapes, intermediality and spectatorship

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Bruce Willis as John McClane in Die Hard (John McTiernan, 1988)

The image seems to be a way of marking such a potential separation between exterior and interior while belonging to both. Moreover, that condition of holding ‘in sight’, as a means of externalisation as belonging to the image, is realised in the easy conceptual slippage from ‘in sight’ to ‘insight’- originally ‘internal sight’ or seeing with the eyes of the mind, that later becomes a seeing into a thing or subject. To bring an object within sight is to affect the ‘inner eye’, to re-formulate the relationship of the visible to the invisible, presence to absence.  Lindsay Smith, ‘Foreword: In-Sight’, Excursions, Vol. 1, Issue 1 (June 2010), i-ii

Thanks to the regular updates to Jurn, the excellent search-engine that Film Studies For Free uses in its every waking hour (and then dreams of every night), FSFF found its way to a newish e-journal — Excursions — with a first issue replete with interesting and, yes, insightful items on film.

Its Mission Statement reads as follows:

Excursions is an invitation to journey into the unfamiliar, a space in which to reflect upon the travels of concepts, beyond the boundaries of one’s discipline. An on-line peer-reviewed journal, Excursions is designed to showcase high-quality, innovative and inventive postgraduate research. Run by postgraduates in the School of English at the University of Sussex, we aim to encourage work that plays with the permeable nature of academic disciplines. As such, our interest lies in the interdisciplinary. Each issue of the journal has a theme which contributors can interpret as they see fit. We welcome critical papers or creative pieces and seek to place cultural, political, artistic and scientific discourses together in surprising combinations and illuminating moments of collision.

And here is the table of contents:

Articles

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>Seeing the join: on film editing

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In memoriam Dede Allen  
(December 3, 1923 – April 17, 2010)
The below entry was originally published the day before Dede Allen died. Allen was the highly innovative editor of such notable films as Bonnie and Clyde, The Hustler, Rachel, Rachel, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Night Moves, Slap Shot, Reds, The Breakfast Club and Henry and June

Dissolve by Aaron Valdez (2003): “Found footage film constructed of hundreds of dissolves taken from old educational films and reassembled to create a meditation on our own impermanence”. 

Film Studies For Free presents a much requested links list today, one to openly accessible, high quality scholarly studies of film editing. Without further ado, let’s jump cut straight to it:

  • ‘The Art of Film Editing’, Special Issue of P.O.V: A Danish Journal of Film Studies, edited by Richard Raskin, Number 6 December 1998 – PDF containing:
    • Søren Kolstrup, ‘The notion of editing’   
    • Sidsel Mundal, ‘Notes of an editing teacher’  
    • Mark Le Fanu, ‘On editing’
    • Vinca Wiedemann, ‘Film editing – a hidden art?’
    • Edvin Kau, ‘Separation or combination of fragments? Reflections on editing’
    • Lars Bo Kimersgaard, ‘Editing in the depth of the surface. Some basic principles of graphic editing’
    • Martin Weinreich, ‘The urban inferno. On the æsthetics of Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver
    • Scott MacKenzie, ‘Closing arias: Operatic montage in the closing sequences of the trilogies of Coppola and Leone’
    • Claus Christensen, ‘A vast edifice of memories: the cyclical cinema of Terence Davies’,
    • Richard Raskin, ‘Five explanations for the jump cuts in Godard’s Breathless