Journal of European Television History and Culture

A new multi-media e-journal on the past and present of European television

Journal of European Television History and Culture is to be the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It will offer an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. With its interdisciplinary profile, the journal is open to many disciplinary perspectives on European television – including television history, media studies, media sociology, cultural studies and television studies.

If only for pretty sound, nominal reasons, Film Studies For Free doesn’t usually stray too far beyond the field of free film studies. Today is an exception, however, simply because of an exceptional, new, and also free to access, online publication.

The inaugural issue of the new Journal of European Television History and Culture is devoted to ‘Making Sense of Digital Sources‘, a hugely important topic for all audiovisual forms and cultures. Its editors write,

In the past few years national broadcasting archives and audiovisual libraries have taken important steps in the digitisation of their sources. Consequently, some of their material has already become available online. But as access to television material online across national borders remains fractured and scattered, European funded projects such as Video Active (2006-2009) and EUscreen (2009-2012) try to tackle some of the main problems with transnational access:

  • the lack of interoperability between archival data-bases both at the level of metadata and semantics;
  • the non-existence of proven scenarios for the use of audiovisual material at a European level;
  • the complexity of rights issues and the lack of contextualisation of digitised sources.

     At the FIAT/IFTA conference in Paris in 2004, the European Television History Network (ETHN) was launched, aiming at promoting the need for a transnational perspective on the history and culture of television in Europe. The archival situation and the accessibility for researchers vary considerably in the different European countries. That is why ETHN acknowledged the necessity of cooperation between archives and academics on a European scale in order to bridge academic research and archival initiatives. The Journal of European Television History and Culture builds on these initiatives and is closely related to EUscreen of which the e-journal is an important feature.[from Andreas Fickers and Sonja de Leeuw. ‘Editorial’]

FSFF salutes EUScreen, ETHN, and especially, on this the occasion of its birth, the Journal of European Television History and Culture.

It can only hope that European (and, indeed, non-European) archival film culture and studies will learn much (and quickly) from the wonderful and increasingly joined up examples of its televisual counterparts.

Vol 1, No 1 (2012):Table of Contents
Editorial

Articles

Advertisements

ALPHAVILLE, a new journal of film and screen media

A poster of Jean-Luc Godard’s Alphaville, une étrange aventure de Lemmy Caution (1965)

Alphaville is the first fully peer-reviewed online film journal in Ireland. It is edited by staff and PhD students in Film Studies at University College Cork. It will be published twice a year, in Summer and Winter, with both open and themed issues that will aim to provoke debate in the most topical issues in film and screen studies. [More about Alphaville]

There is no better title […] for a new journal that proposes to explore the constitutive hybridity of the moving image—analog and digital, commercial and avant-garde, mainstream and independent, popular and elitist—without forgetting how its roots spread in artistic and productive practices that have always been far more composite and multilayered than our critical categories seemed to wish to account for. Calling for the breaking down of disciplinary boundaries, media fields and critical categories, Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media aspires to be a laboratory for new interpretative ideas on the moving image of yesterday, of today and of tomorrow. This inaugural issue, in particular, foregrounds cultural, spatial, productive and aesthetic issues that aim to set in motion our thinking about European cinema within multilayered critical, cultural and geopolitical models, and in light of the complexity of the flow of images that characterises our media landscape. The transnationality, transculturality and transmediality of contemporary European cinemas are undoubtedly going to shape and occupy the research agenda for some time to come.  [Laura Rascaroli, ‘Back to the Future: The European Film Studies Agenda Today’]

There’s a new open access film journal on the block, everybody! Great news in Film Studies For Free‘s humble opinion. Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media has just published its first issue, along with calls for papers for two further issues, to boot.

The first issue is themed, and here’s what its editors say about their choice of organising topic:

Alphaville Issue 1, European Cinema: Transnational, Transcultural, Transmedial stems thematically from an international graduate film studies conference that we co-organised in May 2010 at University College Cork. The conference addressed the permeability of European spaces—geopolitical, sociocultural, productive and aesthetic—within a post-1989 cinematic context. This Issue, however, moves the focus beyond such a specific—albeit multilayered—epoch, encompassing research on both past and contemporary filmmaking, in a bid to showcase the “movement” that was and still is at the heart of European cinema with regard to its interrelationships of geography, culture and form. Inspired by the many seminal works on European cinema that have gone before it, we seek to contribute to the debate a collection that is at once original, in its theoretical and thematic scope, and fresh, in its demonstration of inspiring new work by early career scholars (an attribute that affords us the knowledge that this thriving area in our field will continue to be so).

FSFF thinks it’s a great issue packed with items of interest for film scholars, beginning with Natalia Pinázza‘s brilliant article on Sandra Kogut’s multinational coproduction documentary Un passeport hongrois/The Hungarian Passport (2001).

Tu es très bienvenu Alphaville!

Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media Issue 1 (Summer 2011)

Editorial:

Articles:

Book Reviews and Festival and Conference Reports:

[Compiled by Jill Moriarty, Deborah Mellamphy and Stefano Odorico, University College Cork]

email: alphavillejournal@gmail.com

Issue 2, Winter 2011, Space and Time in Film.

Issue 3, Summer 2012, Sound, Voice, Music.

cfp: http://www.alphavillejournal.com/CallforPapers.html

>Routledge Film Studies free online: Celebrity and Stardom; European Cinema; Race and Film; and Audience and Spectatorship

>

Update at 14.33 BST: The PDF files linked to here are currently not working. Will sort out and update as soon as possible. Apologies for any inconvenience.
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel in the The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

While it is often the emergence of exceptions that proves rules, the very existence of Film Studies For Free shows that there might occasionally be such a thing as a free lunch.

At the same time, this wily blog is certainly no purist when it comes to campaigning for Open Access in scholarly publishing. FSFF‘s inbuilt pragmatism means that it is always very happy to pass on news of the experiments of otherwise ‘closed’ or ‘subscription only’ academic publishers with marketing strategies involving limited free online access to their scholarly publications.

While there is, as yet, no challenger on the horizon to Intellect‘s extensive championing of the Film Studies freebie, publishing giant Routledge is currently offering up occasional free ‘article collections’ for particular subjects. Their Film Studies collection is focused on the following four key themes: Celebrity and Stardom; European Cinema; Race and Film; and Audience and Spectatorship.

Free access to the below articles in their current collection will last until December 31, 2010, so do be sure to download them before then.

    Wide Screen Call For Papers on Contemporary European Film and Media Production

    TVSpain - Spain on Video

    Still and Trailer for the latest film from the current master of European film production and multimedia marketing –Pedro Almodóvars Los abrazos rotos/Broken Embraces (Spain, 2009)

    Film Studies For Free is always happy to post Open-Access related, Film and Media Studies calls for papers. Below is one such call for an OA journal that FSFF has profiled and linked to before: Wide Screen, a peer-reviewed open access academic journal of screen studies that encompasses a multi-disciplinary approach and is devoted to the critical study of cinema and television from historical, theoretical, political, and aesthetic perspectives.

    Call For Paper – Special Issue of Wide Screen

    European Producers and Production: Contemporary practices in film, television and multimedia environments

    Edited by Professor Graham Roberts (Liverpool Screen School, Liverpool John Moores University) and Dr Dorota Ostrowska (School of History of Art, Film and Visual Media, Birkbeck, University of London)

    About the Special Issue

    This issue of Wide Screen is interested in the ways in which the contemporary media environment has changed the role and function of a producer. We would like to understand new models of production emerging as a result of new media environments (multimedia, game industry, internet). Does the multimedia environment lead to a greater specialisation on the part of particular producers in relation to the content they deliver, or does it result in producers extending their activity into a wider range of media and content? How do the profession, work, role and function of a producer differ depending on the national context in which they function? What is the impact of EU-wide policies on production practices in Europe?

    Possible topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

    Wide Screen invites articles on individual producers focusing on one of the following themes: co-productions, festival circuits (film, television and computer games markets), EU funding programmes and policies, education and training, freelancers vs in-house producers, networking, contracts, creativity, risk-taking, types of producers (creative, executive, line-producers), contracts, relationship with talent (directors, writers, actors), DVD releases (in particular special collectors editions)/DVD companies; production companies; awards and prizes; relationship with distribution and exhibition sector; producers of shorts, documentaries, fiction; sourcing content (book fairs, theatre productions); content ownership; piracy; private funding, sponsorship, equity versus public funding;

    Deadline

    Deadline for submission of full papers: 10 November, 2009

    Guidelines and submission information

    Articles should be between 4000 and 6000 words can be submitted using the online submission system: http://widescreenjournal.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions

    Wide Screen adheres to a strict double blind review, which is defined here: http://widescreenjournal.org/index.php/journal/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess

    Any questions/enquiries should be sent to Dorota Ostrowska (D.Ostrowska@bbk.ac.uk) and Graham Roberts (G.Roberts@ljmu.ac.uk)

    >Wide Screen Call For Papers on Contemporary European Film and Media Production

    >

    http://www.tvspain.tv/playerembed.swf?movie=http://www.tvspain.tv/videos/Brouken.flv&thumb=http://www.tvspain.tv/uploads/video_pictures/brokenth160.jpg

    TVSpain - Spain on Video

    Still and Trailer for the latest film from the current master of European film production and multimedia marketing –Pedro Almodóvars Los abrazos rotos/Broken Embraces (Spain, 2009)

    Film Studies For Free is always happy to post Open-Access related, Film and Media Studies calls for papers. Below is one such call for an OA journal that FSFF has profiled and linked to before: Wide Screen, a peer-reviewed open access academic journal of screen studies that encompasses a multi-disciplinary approach and is devoted to the critical study of cinema and television from historical, theoretical, political, and aesthetic perspectives.

    Call For Paper – Special Issue of Wide Screen

    European Producers and Production: Contemporary practices in film, television and multimedia environments

    Edited by Professor Graham Roberts (Liverpool Screen School, Liverpool John Moores University) and Dr Dorota Ostrowska (School of History of Art, Film and Visual Media, Birkbeck, University of London)

    About the Special Issue

    This issue of Wide Screen is interested in the ways in which the contemporary media environment has changed the role and function of a producer. We would like to understand new models of production emerging as a result of new media environments (multimedia, game industry, internet). Does the multimedia environment lead to a greater specialisation on the part of particular producers in relation to the content they deliver, or does it result in producers extending their activity into a wider range of media and content? How do the profession, work, role and function of a producer differ depending on the national context in which they function? What is the impact of EU-wide policies on production practices in Europe?

    Possible topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

    Wide Screen invites articles on individual producers focusing on one of the following themes: co-productions, festival circuits (film, television and computer games markets), EU funding programmes and policies, education and training, freelancers vs in-house producers, networking, contracts, creativity, risk-taking, types of producers (creative, executive, line-producers), contracts, relationship with talent (directors, writers, actors), DVD releases (in particular special collectors editions)/DVD companies; production companies; awards and prizes; relationship with distribution and exhibition sector; producers of shorts, documentaries, fiction; sourcing content (book fairs, theatre productions); content ownership; piracy; private funding, sponsorship, equity versus public funding;

    Deadline

    Deadline for submission of full papers: 10 November, 2009

    Guidelines and submission information

    Articles should be between 4000 and 6000 words can be submitted using the online submission system: http://widescreenjournal.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions

    Wide Screen adheres to a strict double blind review, which is defined here: http://widescreenjournal.org/index.php/journal/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess

    Any questions/enquiries should be sent to Dorota Ostrowska (D.Ostrowska@bbk.ac.uk) and Graham Roberts (G.Roberts@ljmu.ac.uk)

    Touching on Touch of Evil: Projecting Latin America at the Movies

    Film Studies For Free (returning after a short unplanned break filled with unfortunate technical hitches of the sick computer kind) is happy to bring its loyal readers news of a wonderful weblog devoted to studying

    the ways in which Latin America has figured in Hollywood and European cinema. Rather than lamenting the distance between stereotype and reality, it is interested in the functions served by the innumerable projections of fantasized Latin Americas onto the silver screen.

    This website – Projections – was founded in 2005 by the renowned Latin-Americanist scholar Jon Beasley-Murray, currently Assistant Professor in the Department of French, Hispanic, and Italian Studies at the University of British Columbia, Canada. As his university website testifies, Beasley-Murray is a longstanding practitioner and exponent of Open Access scholarship with numerous of his excellent publications archived online. He is also author of the important weblog Posthegemony.

    Projectionsproject is to write about Hollywood and European movies ‘in which Latin America plays a part, however small’. Beasley-Murray asks: ‘Is there some shared element beyond the contingent commonality of location or theme? My wager is that there is, and that it’s something worth writing about. Indeed, my suspicion is that when Hollywood goes Latin, it reveals something essential about cinema tout court.’ The index by title of the many films so far examined can be found by clicking HERE.

    For Spring 2009, this project has been aided by a UBC grant to hire three undergraduate student researchers to expand this online database of Latin America on screen. As Beasley-Murray notes in a blurb on the UBC website of his encouragement of students to write blogs

    The idea is in large part to get beyond the ghetto of closed, proprietary educational software (WebCT and the like), to give students a sense that they are producing research on a public stage, and to integrate their learning with their own real world experience of the internet.

    Important work, indeed. To conclude its celebration of the achievement of Projections, Film Studies For Free decided to drill down and produce an extensive series of high-quality, online-resource links pertaining to one of the films studied on that blog (and a great favourite of this blogger, too): Orson Welles’s 1958 Touch of Evil. The list is headed by Projections‘s great entry on this film.

    Online analyses of and information about Touch of Evil:

    Online discussions of and information about the making, remaking, and DVD production of Touch of Evil:

    On Orson Welles, with significant discussion of Touch of Evil:

    Also see the wonderful Wellesnet, the Orson Welles Web Resource, together with its sister project The Museum of Orson Welles which continues to ‘compile and present the available radio and recorded works of Orson Welles’.

    >Touching on Touch of Evil: Projecting Latin America at the Movies

    >

    Film Studies For Free (returning after a short unplanned break filled with unfortunate technical hitches of the sick computer kind) is happy to bring its loyal readers news of a wonderful weblog devoted to studying

    the ways in which Latin America has figured in Hollywood and European cinema. Rather than lamenting the distance between stereotype and reality, it is interested in the functions served by the innumerable projections of fantasized Latin Americas onto the silver screen.

    This website – Projections – was founded in 2005 by the renowned Latin-Americanist scholar Jon Beasley-Murray, currently Assistant Professor in the Department of French, Hispanic, and Italian Studies at the University of British Columbia, Canada. As his university website testifies, Beasley-Murray is a longstanding practitioner and exponent of Open Access scholarship with numerous of his excellent publications archived online. He is also author of the important weblog Posthegemony.

    Projectionsproject is to write about Hollywood and European movies ‘in which Latin America plays a part, however small’. Beasley-Murray asks: ‘Is there some shared element beyond the contingent commonality of location or theme? My wager is that there is, and that it’s something worth writing about. Indeed, my suspicion is that when Hollywood goes Latin, it reveals something essential about cinema tout court.’ The index by title of the many films so far examined can be found by clicking HERE.

    For Spring 2009, this project has been aided by a UBC grant to hire three undergraduate student researchers to expand this online database of Latin America on screen. As Beasley-Murray notes in a blurb on the UBC website of his encouragement of students to write blogs

    The idea is in large part to get beyond the ghetto of closed, proprietary educational software (WebCT and the like), to give students a sense that they are producing research on a public stage, and to integrate their learning with their own real world experience of the internet.

    Important work, indeed. To conclude its celebration of the achievement of Projections, Film Studies For Free decided to drill down and produce an extensive series of high-quality, online-resource links pertaining to one of the films studied on that blog (and a great favourite of this blogger, too): Orson Welles’s 1958 Touch of Evil. The list is headed by Projections‘s great entry on this film.
    Online analyses of and information about Touch of Evil:

    Online discussions of and information about the making, remaking, and DVD production of Touch of Evil:

    On Orson Welles, with significant discussion of Touch of Evil:

    Also see the wonderful Wellesnet, the Orson Welles Web Resource, together with its sister project The Museum of Orson Welles which continues to ‘compile and present the available radio and recorded works of Orson Welles’.