Age Spots and Spotlights: Celebrity, Ageing and Performance

Actress Nicole Kidman at the 2011 Santa Barbara International Film Festival. Photograph by Caroline David, shared under a  Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license at Wikipedia. Listen to Pam Cook’s brilliant talk about Kidman’s “commodity stardom” here.

Film Studies For Free was thrilled to discover that audio files of the talks from the conference on Age Spots and Spotlights: Celebrity, Ageing and Performance, which took place on December 9, 2011 at Birkbeck College, London, are now available online for listening and download.

The talks are of a very high calibre indeed, so several hours of truly worthwhile, scholarly listening await you. Links and a description of the event are given below. Enjoy!

Organisers’ description of the event:

Diane Keaton has just published her memoirs. Reflecting on becoming a mother at 50 and kissing Jack Nicholson at 57, Keaton is ageing in her own unique way. On Friday 9 December Birkbeck, University of London, [held] a major research symposium exploring how stars including Keaton, Brigitte Bardot, Nicole Kidman and Elizabeth Taylor aged in the public eye.

  This one-day research symposium, organised by Dr Janet McCabe and Dr Deborah Jermyn, [debated] two significant (and interlinked) issues; performance and ageing. Encompassing both historical and topical case studies, speakers [considered] a range of celebrities, stars and case studies drawn from different national and industrial contexts. The keynote speaker w[as] Professor Ginette Vincendeau (King’s College, University of London).

   The co-organisers believe the time is right for new scholarship focussing on ageing and celebrity and for us to think anew about how we think about growing old. We hear endless reports of how age is becoming increasingly relative, ‘60 is the new 40’ and so on’. With the baby boomer generation going into retirement and being reluctant to be written off as ‘old’, there is a heightened demand for positive representations of ageing. At the same time, stars like Helen Mirren are re-writing the rules for older women working in Hollywood, says Jermyn. The symposium addresse[d] some of these issues and ask[ed]s just how much things are really changing, since women stars are still subjected to a much more critical eye as they age than are their male co-stars. ‘Growing old, and I do mean growing’ writes Diane Keaton, ‘requires reinvention’. I like this quote, says McCabe. We must adjust our ideas about how we age without talking exclusively about how we defy the ageing process. This symposium adopt[ed] different perspectives […] about how celebrity is changing our perceptions and attitudes toward ageing and getting older.

Panel 1

Panel 2

Keynote

Film Studies with added awesomeness

He knows his stuff

Hey readers…. A really quick link today, one specially for the end of a long and tiring teaching term. Film Studies For Free loves this Tumblr by girldetective and hopes that you will find it stimulating, too.

It’s all part of the Hey Girl/Ryan Gosling Tumblr meme (the origins of which can be found here). In a nutshell, following the success of Danielle Henderson’s blog, Feminist Ryan Gosling (which, in turn, was a derivative of the blog F[***] Yeah Ryan Gosling), many other bloggers rehashed the format using references to different fields of study, including Typography, International Development and Rhetoric. Being the nerdy cinephile that I am, I kept hoping that somebody would create a Film Studies version of the meme, but when that didn’t happen, I decided to just make one myself. [girldetective’s mission statement]

Also, must read: Anne Helen Petersen of Celebrity Gossip, Academic Style on the Gosling meme.

Hat tip to Nelson D. (aka @nelly061) for passing the link onto FSFF.

>On Spectatorship, Reception Studies, Fandom and Fan Studies: In Media Res and Flow

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Picture from Gadjo Cardenas Sevilla via Flickr, used and altered under Creative Commons License permission.

Film Studies For Free wanted you to know you have to go with the new issue of Flow: A Critical Forum on Television and Media Culture on Fandom and Fan Studies.  Oh, and then you can join the party already started at In Media Res on issues of spectatorship. The great contents of these worthy e-journals are directly linked to below:

In Media Res December 13-17, 2010 (Theme week organized by Ian Peters [Georgia State University])

Flow: A Critical Forumon Television and Media Culture

  • “Revisiting Fandom in Africa” by Olivier J. Tchouaffe The application of fandom and its resources is not the same in all cultures, and African fans might not be recognized as legitimate fans. The point of this piece is to demonstrate that there is a unifying figure of American domination of mass culture.

>PhD Theses on Hal Hartley, John Wayne and Clint Eastwood, and Spanish cinema studies

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Javier Bardem as Raúl and Penélope Cruz as Silvia in Jamón Jamón (Bigas Luna, 1992) as discussed in Rebecca Naughten’s work Spain Made Flesh: Reflections and projections of the national in contemporary Spanish stardom, 1992-2007

Film Studies For Free was delighted when Spanish cinema scholar Rebecca Naughten responded to its request for information about online PhD theses. Not only did Rebecca let FSFF know that her own really excellent thesis has recently been made available online, but she also did the hard work of trawling through the online repository at the University of Newcastle, where her work is stored, to find four other very good theses archived there. ¡Muchísimas gracias, Rebecca!

These works have just been added to FSFF‘s permanent list of Online Film and Moving Image Studies PhD Theses (see the link in the table of contents in the right-hand sidebar for future reference) which now makes more than 130 theses accessible to you at the click of your mouse.

Do please let FSFF know if your online PhD thesis, or others you know of, is not yet in this list.

>Routledge Film Studies free online: Celebrity and Stardom; European Cinema; Race and Film; and Audience and Spectatorship

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Update at 14.33 BST: The PDF files linked to here are currently not working. Will sort out and update as soon as possible. Apologies for any inconvenience.
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel in the The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

While it is often the emergence of exceptions that proves rules, the very existence of Film Studies For Free shows that there might occasionally be such a thing as a free lunch.

At the same time, this wily blog is certainly no purist when it comes to campaigning for Open Access in scholarly publishing. FSFF‘s inbuilt pragmatism means that it is always very happy to pass on news of the experiments of otherwise ‘closed’ or ‘subscription only’ academic publishers with marketing strategies involving limited free online access to their scholarly publications.

While there is, as yet, no challenger on the horizon to Intellect‘s extensive championing of the Film Studies freebie, publishing giant Routledge is currently offering up occasional free ‘article collections’ for particular subjects. Their Film Studies collection is focused on the following four key themes: Celebrity and Stardom; European Cinema; Race and Film; and Audience and Spectatorship.

Free access to the below articles in their current collection will last until December 31, 2010, so do be sure to download them before then.

    >Read all about it: first issue of Celebrity Studies

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    Publicity shot of the celebratedly “eternally young”
    (boyishly middle-aged) film star Jackie Chan

    Film Studies For Free is delighted to flag up Routledge’s new journal Celebrity Studies as its inaugural issue is available free to download online. A quick glance at the names of editors and contributors will show that this is a highly worthwhile new venture. A detailed examination of its rationale and its contents underscores that very positive first impression.


    Celebrity Studies focuses on the critical exploration of celebrity, stardom and fame. It seeks to make sense of celebrity by drawing upon a range of (inter)disciplinary approaches, media forms, historical periods and national contexts.

    FSFF‘s increasingly ancient author particularly enjoyed the most ‘film studies’ oriented article in this issue: Chris Holmlund’s wonderful essay ‘Celebrity, Ageing, And Jackie Chan: Middle-Aged Asian In Transnational Action‘. Below is the abstract for that contribution, and below that are direct links to all the issue’s contents:

    Assessing ageing is one of the key tasks confronting celebrity and star studies today. If film could reflect upon its own relation to death only from the 1950s on, in films such as Sunset boulevard (1950) and Whatever happened to Baby Jane (1962), where ‘the aging process of the first generation of stars exposed a glamour worn thin on screen’, today ‘the allure of the star’ is most definitely ‘inseparable from his or her heroism and ruin’ (Celeste 2005, Journal of Popular Film and Television, 33, pp. 32, 29). Today, moreover, middle age increasingly matters. With 78 million people in the US aged 44-62, internet and print marketing, movies, television and more tout rejuvenation through Botox, steroids, plastic surgery and wardrobe/cosmetic make-overs. Hollywood stars and celebrities point us towards a brave new world where mature adulthood is seen primarily in chronological, biological and medical terms. It is no coincidence that photographs of healthy, wealthy stars grace each issue of AARP Magazine. Trainers, nips, tucks, lighting, make-up and digital retouching all help. Nor is it coincidence that roughly half are men – most white; a goodly number black. What, however, of middle-aged, Asian, male celebrities? Global mega-star Jackie Chan offers the perfect opportunity to explore ageing, race and masculinity in transnational action. Drawing upon Gina Marchetti’s analysis of Chan’s ‘flexible masculinity’ in the Rush hour trilogy (2009), I study the nine films released theatrically post-2000 featuring the middle-aged star. In conclusion, I speculate upon what the future will bring, remembering that we are all ‘aged by culture.’ Screen Actors Guild (SAG) statistics chillingly indicate just how few roles are available to actors (if especially to actresses) of all races after 40. Asians in particular are marginalised. Might other models of ageing be possible? How do film stars and celebrities impact upon conceptions and experiences of ageing today in our increasingly ‘mediagenic’ culture? Jackie Chan serves here as ‘special case’ and as ‘test case’.

    Volume 1, Issue 1: Table of Contents


      Articles:


        Celebrity Forum:

          Book Reviews:

            Tune in to Antenna

            [Film Studies For Free will be sorry to say goodbye to Tobey Maguire‘s Peter Parker/Spider-Man…]

            Film Studies For Free wanted to let its readers know about Antenna, a very stimulating blog from graduate students and faculty in the Media and Cultural Studies area of the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

            Here’s what this relatively new site says about itself:

            Antenna is a collectively authored media and cultural studies blog committed to timely yet careful analysis of texts, news, and events from across the popular culture spectrum. The site regularly responds to new works and developments in television, film, music, gaming, digital video, the Internet, print, and the media industries.

            Antenna is intended to address a broad public inside and outside the university walls. Within those walls, though, it further intends to bridge the gap between scholarly journals, which remain the paradigm for scholarly discourse but too often lack the ability to reply to issues and events in media with any immediacy, and single-author media scholar blogs, which support swift commentary but are limited in their reliance upon the effort and perspectives of individuals. Coordinated by a group of writers who draw on a variety of approaches and methodologies, Antenna, therefore, exists as a means to analyze media news and texts, both as they happen and from multiple perspectives.

            Antenna is currently operated and edited by graduate students and faculty in the Media and Cultural Studies area of the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Although, while in its current stage, the content published on the site is written largely by members of that program, Antenna is currently in the process of expanding our author team, and we hope eventually to include contributions and comments from a diverse collection of writers.

            Antenna’s goal is to create a forum in which readers and contributors participate in active, open, and thoughtful debate about media and culture.

            Antenna is designed to respond quickly to events, and thus rather than be published on a set, periodic schedule, Antenna updates its content continually. Because Antenna is interested in timely responses, we encourage short entries. Extensive presentation of evidence is not required, though supplementary links are encouraged.

            With its extremely lively house style, and wide-ranging topics, FSFF thinks Antenna has a great future ahead of it. For examples of some good film-related posts, it recommends you check out the following to start with:  

            You can also follow Antenna’s updates on Twitter.

            In fond memory of Patrick Swayze


            The power behind Film Studies For Free‘s e-throne is a ‘person of a certain age‘, making her (chrono) logically susceptible to a good number of the many charms and talents of actor Patrick Swayze. She is, thus, saddened by the news of his untimely death.

            Swayze was an actor of surprisingly slight physical stature, but one who loomed very large and very beautifully, not only in Hollywood and independent cinema, and, of course, in the estimation of his many fans and admirers, but also in the musings of quite a few Film Studies scholars. In particular relation to the latter, he helped to inspire — FSFF is sure — many worthwhile studies of (post-)modern gender and sexuality, ‘looking relations‘, and acting in film.

            In fond memory of his work for the screen, a few links to openly-accessible items of some of that scholarship are given below:

            Yvonne Tasker, Spectacular Bodies: Gender, Genre, and the Action Cinema (London: Routledge, 1993)

            Christina Lane, Feminist Hollwyood: From Born in Flames to Point Break (Wayne State University Press, 2000)

            John Izod, Myth, Mind, and the Screen: Understanding the Heroes of Our Times (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001)

            On Stardom/Celebrity and Film Acting/Performance


            Image of Barbara Stanwyck, 1907-1990

            Film Studies For Free is star-studies-struck today, but it has opted to combine those glitzy fascinations with its deep interest in film acting and performance studies. The result is a broad search-topic which has brought forth yet another rich vein of online and openly accessible film and media studies, as the multiple links below — to wonderful new work as well as to some classic research — should testify.


          • Elizabeth Abele, ‘”The Glory of Cary Grant and Other Girlish Delights’, Images Journal, Issue 5, November 9
          • Richard Armstrong, ‘Modernity and the Maniac: The Fall of Janet Leigh’, Images Journal, 2004: Page One: Introduction | Page Two: Janet Leigh in Touch of Evil | Page Three: Janet Leigh in Psycho Page Four: The Shower Scene | Page Five: Janet Leigh as Icon
          • Guy Austin, ‘”In Fear and Pain”: Stardom and the Body in Two French Ghost Films’, Scope, Issue 7, February 2007
          • Serafina K. Bathrick, ‘The new star – A beauty and a buddy [Review of Patricia Erens, The Films of Shirley MacLaine (NY: A.S. Barnes, 1978)], Jump Cut, no. 21, Nov. 1979
          • Sylvie Blum-Reid, ‘Review of Lisa Downing & Sue Harris, eds. From Perversion to Purity: The Stardom of Catherine Deneuve. Manchester, New York: Manchester University Press, 2007’, H-France Review Vol. 9 (April 2009), No. 47
          • Lisa Bode: ‘Grave Robbing’ or ‘Career Comeback’? On the Digital Resurrection of Dead Screen Stars in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Laure Bouquerel, ‘Bob Dylan, the Ordinary Star [in Don’t Look Back]’, Oral Tradition, 22/1 (2007): 151-161
          • Cinema and the Female Star – A Symposium Part 1′, Senses of Cinema, 2002: Arletty by Bernard Hemingway; Stéphane Audran by Ray Young; Halle Berry by Charlie Kanganis; Louise Brooks by Tina Marie Camilleri; Geneviève Bujold by Girish Shambu; Bess Flowers by Joe McElhaney; Setsuko Hara by Dan Harper
          • ‘Cinema and the Female Star – A Symposium Part 2’, Senses of Cinema, 2002: Kate Hudson by Peter Tonguette; Anna Karina by Christa Fuller; Ling, Po by Feng-ying Ming; Melina Mercouri by Charlie Kanganis; Samantha Morton by Maximilian Le Cain; Cathy O’Donnell by Brian Frye; Bulle Ogier by Jit Phokaew
          • ‘Cinema and the Female Star – A Symposium Part 3’, Senses of Cinema, 2002: Elizabeth Taylor by Liz Burke; Lili Taylor by Anna Daly; Fay Tincher by Andrew Grossman; Mari Töröcsik by Dina Iordanova; Natalie Wood by Angela Costi; Xiao, Fangfang by Feng-ying Ming; Tsetsiliya Zervudaki by Jorge Didaco
          • Jamil Dakhlia, ‘From the Olympians to the Ordinary Heroes: Stars in the French Popular Press’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Robert E Davis, ‘Anita Page: Stardom in Transition’, in Film and Television Stardom, ed by K-P R Hart (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008) long excerpt
          • Jeannette Delamoir, ‘Eyes Wide Shut: Tom, Nicole, Stardom and Visual Memory’, Transformations, No. 3 (May 2002)
          • Rayna Denison, ‘Disembodied Stars and the Cultural Meanings of Princess Mononoke’s Soundscape’, Scope, Portals Special Issue
          • Patricia Erens, ‘Critical dialogue – In defense of stars [response to Bathrick]’, Jump Cut, no. 21, Nov. 1979
          • Rebecca Feasey, ‘Stardom and Distinction: Sharon Stone and the Problem of Legitimacy’, Scope, May 2004
          • John Flaus, ”’Thanks for your heart, Bart” [film acting theory]’, Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture vol. 5 no 2 (1990)
          • Brian Gallagher, ‘Stars: Some Historical Reflections on the Paradoxes of Stardom in the American Film Industry, 1910-1960’, Images Journal, Issue 3
          • Christine Geraghty, ‘Paris, Hollywood and Kay Kendall’, in Rachel Moseley (ed), Fashioning Film Stars: Dress, Culture, Identity, (Chap 10) pp. 121-133.
          • Tim Groves, ‘The Un/forgiven Director’, Screening the Past, March 2001
          • Tom Gunning, ‘Chaplin and the body of modernity’, Paper, The bfi Charles Chaplin Conference July 2005
          • Outi Hakola, ‘On-screen and Off-screen Monstrosity of Béla Lugosi and Boris Karloff’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Michael Hammond, ‘Charlie [Chaplin] as a Searchlight’, Introduction, The bfi Charles Chaplin Conference July 2005
          • Kylo-Patrick R. Hart, ‘Introduction’, Film and Television Stardom, ed by K-P R Hart (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008)
          • Joan Hawkins, ‘All the World’s a Stage’, Film-Philosophy, vol. 2 no. 1, January 1998
          • Susan Hayward, ‘Stardom: Beyond Desire?’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Stephen Heath, ‘Film Performance’, CineTracts, Vol. 1, No. 2, Summer 1977
          • Su Holmes, ‘Starring… Dyer?’: Re-visiting Star Studies and Contemporary Celebrity Culture’, Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture © 2005 (University of Westminster, London), Vol. 2(2): 6-21
          • Ian Huffer, ”I wanted to be Rocky, but I also wanted to be his wife!’: Heterosexuality and the (Re)construction of Gender in Female Film Audiences’ Consumption of Sylvester Stallone’, Particip@tions Volume 4, Issue 2 (November 2007)
          • Ian Huffer, “‘New Man”, Old Worlds: Re-articulating Masculinity in the Star Persona of Orlando Bloom’, Scope, Issue 9, 2007
          • Ono Hiroyuki, ‘From Chaplin to Kabuki’, Paper, The bfi Charles Chaplin Conference July 2005
          • Jerry R Ivins, ‘The Training of Stage Actors in Film/Video Acting Techniques: An Interdisciplinary Approach’, PhD thesis, Texas Tech University, August 1993
          • Hanna Järvinen, ‘Fans, Fawns and Fauns: Ballet Stardom, Dancing Genius and the Queer Afterlife of Vaslav Nijinsky’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Tamar Jeffers, “Should I surrender?”: performing and interrogating female virginity in Hollywood films 1957-64′, PhD thesis, University of Warwick
          • Gary Johnson and Grant Tracey, ‘Hollywood Stars of the ’30s, featuring James Cagney, Joan Crawford, and Barbara Stanwyck’, Images Journal, Issue 1
          • Sun Jung, ‘Bae Yong-Joon, Hybrid Masculinity & the Counter-coeval Desire of Japanese Female Fans’, Particip@tions Volume 3, Issue 2 Special Edition (November 2006)
          • Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi, ‘Introduction: Stars, History, and the Media’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Kimi Kärki, ‘Cutting the Moss with Laser Beams: The Uses of History in The Rolling Stones Bridges To Babylon Stadium Tour’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Andrew Klevan, ‘A Reply to Adrian Martin[‘s review of Film Performance: From Achievement to Appreciation (London: Wallflower Press, 2006)]’, Fipresci, Issue 4, 2008
          • Barbara Klinger, ‘Say It Again, Sam: Movie Quotation, Performance and Masculinity’,Particip@tions Volume 5, Issue 2 (November 2008)
          • Sven-Erik Klinkmann, ‘Retro Icons and Anachronistic Artists’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Margia Kramer and Renee Shafrensky, ‘Character assassination — Jean Seberg and information control’, Jump Cut, no. 28, April 1983
          • Anneli Lehtisalo, ‘“Oh, My Sweet Hero!” The Filmstar Leif Wager as Emperor Alexander I in Tanssi yli hautojen (1950)’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Wing-Fai Leung, ‘Discursive Stardom in Hong Kong and the Missing Referents’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Victoria Lowe, ‘Performing Hitchcock’: Robert Donat, Film Acting and The 39 Steps (1935)’, Scope, Issue 14, June 2009
          • Rami Mähkä, ‘Comedians as Stars: The Monty Python Troupe’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Charles Maland, ‘Movies, Director/Performers, and Cultural History: Conceptualizing Chaplin and American Culture’, Paper, The bfi Charles Chaplin Conference July 2005
          • Linda Marchant, ‘Concentrated Vision: Celebrity Images from the 1930s and 1940s’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Adrian Martin, ‘Secret Agents [ A review of Andrew Klevan, Film Performance: From Achievement to Appreciation (London: Wallflower Press, 2006)’, Fipresci, Issue 4, 2007
          • Steve Master, ‘A Review of Film Performance: From Achievement to Appreciation by Andrew Klevan [London: Wallflower, 2005]’, Scope, Special Portals Issue
          • Anna Möttölä, ‘Style Star – Admiring Audrey Hepburn in the 1950’s’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Thi Thanh Nga, ‘The long march from Wong to Woo: Asians in Hollywood’ (Race in Contemporary American Cinema: Part 5), Cineaste v21, n4 (Fall, 1995)
          • JaeYoon Park, ‘Asia’s beloved sassy girl: Jun Ji-Hyun’s star image and her transnational stardom’, Jump Cut, No. 51, spring 2009
          • Anne Helen Petersen,‘”We’re Making Our Own Paparazzi”: Twitter and the Construction of Star Authenticity’, Flow TV, May 28, 2009
          • Anne Petersen, ‘Celebrity juice, not from concentrate: Perez Hilton, gossip blogs, and the new star production’, Jump Cut, No. 49, spring 2007
          • Anne Helen Petersen, weblog: Celebrity Gossip, Academic Style – proto-scholastic musings on star studies 2.0
          • VI Pudovkin, Film Technique And Film Acting, Grove Press Inc, 1958
          • Zohar Altman Ravid, ‘The star as a Creation and the Star as a creator: The Case of Barbra Streisand’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Martin Roth, ‘Women in Hollywood musicals: Pulling the plug on Lina Lamont’, Jump Cut, no. 35, April 1990
          • Ulrich Ruedel, ‘Send in the Clones: Chaplin Imitators from Stage to Screen, from Circus to Cartoon’, Paper, The bfi Charles Chaplin Conference July 2005
          • Daniel Sánchez Salas, ‘The Two Spanish Lives Of “Charlot”’, Paper, The bfi Charles Chaplin Conference July 2005
          • Laura Saarenmaa, ‘Female Stars and the Tricky Question of Drinking’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Amy Sargeant, ‘Review of Alan Lovell and Peter Krämer (eds),Screen Acting, and Pamela Robertson Wojcik (ed.), Movie Acting: The Film Reader.(pp 170-176)’, Film Studies, Vol. 8, Summer 2006 (scroll down)
          • Jaakko Seppälä, ‘Love, Hate, and Suicidal Tendencies: The Construction of Rudolph Valentino’s Stardom in Finland 1923-1927’ in History of Stardom Reconsidered, edited by Kari Kallioniemi, Kimi Kärki, Janne Mäkelä and Hannu Salmi. Turku: International Institute for Popular Culture, 2007
          • Steven Shaviro, ‘A Brief History of Celebrity (with special reference to Asia Argento)’, The Pinocchio Theory, May 7, 2009
          • Joerg Sternagel, ‘From Inside Us: Experiencing the Film Actor in Michael Haneke’s Caché’, Film International #39, vol. 7, no. 3
          • Ginette Vincendeau, ‘The New Wave at 50: The star reborn’, Sight & Sound, May 2009
          • Greg Wahl, ‘Go ahead, Punk; Go ahead, Clint [Eastwood]!’, Images Journal, Issue 4: July 97